Studying young children, families and communities to
learn more about growth and development.



The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Duke University
North Carolina State University
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro


The Durham Child Health and Development Study (DCHDS) is supported by the National Science Foundation (grant #BCS-0126475 and #BCS-0720660). Beginning in August of 2002, approximately 200 families from all walks of life enrolled in this study when their infants were 3-months-old and they were adjusting to the birth of their new child. Before the age of three, we saw infants and their families at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months of age. With the help of these families, who have shared their thoughts and experiences about parenthood and the many milestones that their infants passed as they transitioned into toddlerhood, we have begun to learn more about the important contributions to their social, emotional, and cognitive development.

Now that the children have made the critical transition into elementary school, we have continued to see them, and their parents, one time during their Kindergarten, First, and Second Grade years. With additional input from their teachers, we are gaining a comprehensive view of how these infants have developed into young children, and the important factors that have shaped who they are.

Autumn
Principal Investigators

Martha Cox, Ph.D.

Martha Cox is Director of the Center for Developmental Science and Professor of Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Cox is known for her longitudinal studies of families and children and for her methodological contributions to the analysis of family interactions. She is the Principal Investigator of the Durham Child Health and Development Study and she has studied families for over 25 years. She is the author of many books and articles and her work has been cited in publications such as Newsweek, Time, Parent Magazine, The New York Times and Durham's Herald-Sun.






Cathi Propper, Ph.D.

Cathi Propper is the Director of the Durham Child Health and Development Study at the Center for Developmental Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her PhD in Developmental Psychology from Duke University in May of 2006. Dr. Propper’s research examines the development of infant emotion regulation from a behavioral and physiological perspective with a specific focus on the influence of the parent-child relationship. She is currently working on extending this line of research to explore processes of self-regulation in the classroom as influenced by child characteristics and interactions with parents and teachers.

Peter Ornstein, Ph.D.

Peter Ornstein has been a Professor of Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill since 1973. He received his PhD in psychology from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 1968. His basic research interests are in the area of children's cognitive development, focusing primarily on memory and learning. He has also conducted more applied studies on children as eyewitnesses, the role of mother-child conversations on children's memory, and the impact of the school environment on memory development.

Conducted by
Funded by the National Science Foundation
CDS Logo
NSF Logo